Got a question about EU citizenship?

652 questions Ask a question

Prof. Adamski knows all there is to know about Polish citizenship, passports and genealogy. He works around the clock to give you detailed and personalised answers to your questions. Want to know more about your family and their journey from Poland? Leave your questions down below and you might be surprised about what he can uncover!

Ask a question

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

652 questions and answers

  1. Dear Prof. Adamski,

    My great-grandmother was born in 1897. Federal and state census’ from USA are conflicted listing her nationality as Polish or Austrian. She moved to USA in 1899 or 1910 (researching conflicting information) and because a naturalized citizen in 1929.

    Is there any descent for me to hold a dual passport?

    Thank you.

    1. Hello Dave,

      Based on the details you have provided here, it looks like you aren’t eligible for Polish citizenship through confirmation. As your great-grandmother left Poland before it was established as a country in 1918, she would have never officially held Polish citizenship, according to the legislation.

      We do, fortunately, have another option for you to pursue Polish citizenship, if you’re interested. Our grant of Polish citizenship service could be a great option for you, if you are interested. Please have a read through the linked page and send our team an email at citizenship@polaron.com.au if are interested in pursuing this.

      Yours truly,

      Prof. Adamski

  2. Dear Prof. Adamski,

    I’m wondering if it is worth it to pursue Polish citizenship. I had one Polish great grandmother who was still alive when I was born in 1978. She was born in Poland and came to to US b/w 1909 and 1916. She was married to a Russian immigrant in the US. We have her US Naturalization document from 1946. I have no idea if she maintained Polish citizenship until the day I was born, which I understand is a requirement. Was it common for Polish immigrants to renounce their citizenship back then? From what I’ve read, it doesn’t seem like she would have been required to do so in order to become naturalized in the US. Is this true?

    Thank you for your time!

    1. Hello Mariah,

      Thank you for getting in touch.

      From the information you’ve provided, there are a few reasons you are likely not eligible for confirmation of Polish citizenship. Firstly, your great-grandmother left Poland before 1918 (when it was first established as a country) and therefore never held Polish citizenship, according to the legislation.

      In addition, as she married a Russian citizen and naturalised in the US before 1951, she would have lost her citizenship under those circumstances.

      Luckily, we do have another citizenship option for people in similar situations to you. Our grant of Polish citizenship service could be a great option for you, if you are interested. Please have a read through the linked page and send our team an email at citizenship@polaron.com.au if you are interested in pursuing this.

      Yours truly,

      Prof. Adamski

  3. I am an American citizen. My mother and her parents were born in Poland.
    They came to the US in 1929.
    Can you help me find their documentation, birth certificates, issuance of passports, etc.?

    1. Hello Richard,

      Yes, we can absolutely help you with research on your ancestors. Our team mainly focuses on finding documents to help support EU citizenship applications. In your case, Polish.

      From the details you’ve provided, it does sound like you may be eligible for Polish citizenship through confirmation.

      If you would like a more comprehensive analysis of your case, please feel free to book an appointment with one of our EU citizenship experts here to get the process started: https://calendly.com/polaron-european-citizenship/book

      Yours truly,

      Prof. Adamski

  4. My mother was born in an area of Belarus under German occupation in 1916. After the war the area became part of Poland. As Jews, my mother’s family were harassed under all three regimes and emigrated to the United States in 1921. My mother was later naturalized as a US citizen.

    Question: do I have a potential claim for citizenship from any of those three countries?

    1. Hello Ed,

      Thanks for your question.

      Based on the information you have provided, you probably qualify for Polish citizenship. However, it’ll depend on what year your mother married and naturalized. Please feel free to reach out to citizenship@polaron.com.au

      Yours truly,

      Prof. Adamski

  5. My mother was born in Danzig in 1927 and emigrated to the USA in 1929. What dual citizenship am I entitled?
    Sincerely, Paul

    1. Hello Paul,

      Thank you for your question.

      Based on the information you have provided, you are potentially entitled to Polish citizenship, if your mother and her family were of Polish nationality/origins.

      Yours truly,

      Prof. Adamski

    1. Hello Justin,

      Thank you for your question!

      You can gain citizenship based on descent if your grandfather was a German citizen at the time of your father’s birth. But from what it sounds like, your father was born to a US citizen in Germany, which unfortunately does not make you eligible for German citizenship by descent.

      You do qualify, however, for German citizenship through naturalisation. If you’re interested in pursuing this option, please email our team at citizenship@polaron.com.au.

      Yours truly,

      Prof. Adamski

  6. Hi professor. My name is Mr. Gregory Lindert. I was born in Poland in 1952, and I do have my birth certificate. What do I have to do to get papers that will say that I have duo citizenship? and if I establish that, should I also get a polish passport..

    1. Hello Gregory,

      Thank you for getting in touch.

      From what you’ve described, you will need to have your Polish citizenship confirmed, which will allow you to apply for a Polish passport.

      Please email our team at citizenship@polaron.com.au for some more advice on how you can get started on the process.

      Yours truly,

      Prof. Adamski

  7. Hi, I am interested in determining if I am eligible for Lithuanian (dual, if possible) citizenship. My ancestors, my great-great-grandparents, were born in Kraštine, Taurage in the 1880’s, and emigrated to the US sometime before 1914 (they had 5 daughters all born in the US). Am I still eligible if the ancestor is a great-great-grandparent? If not, would that mean my father is eligible (they were his great-grandparents)?
    The names of my ancestors in Lithuania were:
    August Waitekus (born 16 Oct 1883)
    Josephine Pikoraitis Waitekus (b.1886)
    I do not yet know what year they emigrated or were married, just that it occurred before 1914.
    Any advise you may have would be greatly appreciated; thank you so much!

    1. Hello Katey,

      Thank you for your question.

      You are not eligible for Lithuanian Citizenship, as your ancestors immigrated prior to Lithuanian Independence of 1918. Lithuania was an independent country between the years 1918 and 1940.

      Yours truly,

      Prof. Adamski

  8. Hello Professor.
    My name is Ian Perry. And would like to know if I can get my German passport. Whom my great grandfather was German. I have my grandfarthers South African Passport both in his German name and the new surname the government gave them when my great grandfather ran from the war. Please may you assist me I’d you can.
    Kind Regards
    Ian Perry

Ask a question

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *